“San Jose City’s Yummy Pansit Kanin”

Pansit Kanin
Photo Credits: Kuya Max and Ate Aryan

8 OUT OF 10 STARS

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A quaint, little city in a province that’s known for its endless rice fields, San Jose City, Nueva Ecija offers a refreshing respite from the usual noise and busyness of Metro Manila. I was given a chance to work in SJC earlier this year and the experience compels me to permanently set aside a gigantic space in my heart for this beloved jewel approaching the foot of the famous Sierra Madre mountains (No kidding, I really miss you, SJC!).

One of SJC’s varied attractions is its delectable Pansit Kanin, a local delicacy that’s offered in the carinderias (native food stalls) that pepper the lively city center. Continue reading “San Jose City’s Yummy Pansit Kanin”

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“Providence”

“It’s just another dreary day,” she reminds herself, as she forces her body to get out of bed. “Nothing will happen today,” she whispers, dejectedly, willing herself not to cry.

She hastily fixes her bed and takes a deep breath, steadying her mind, if not her heart, as she goes downstairs to help make breakfast. “If there’s even some food left in the fridge,” she mumbles quietly.

These past months have been horrible. Her contract with her old company ended and there wasn’t any other job waiting for her. Being the breadwinner of the family was tough but it was even harder because she couldn’t find anything that could tide them over. What with all the bills to pay–the electric bill, the water bill, the rent–and the money to buy food, mainly.

She ambles over to the kitchen and finds her mom mixing something in a bowl. “Good morning, mama,” she whispers. She opens the fridge and finds several packets of food inside–a tray of eggs, a pack of biscuits, a carton of milk, some vegetables. That startles her. She looks questioningly at her mother. “Ma, why do we have food?”

Her mother smiles, gently. “Your brother sent a bit of cash to help,” she explains, “There’s some coffee and bread here. You need to eat. You’re getting a lot thinner, Trisha,” she adds as she hands Trisha a steaming mug of coffee.

She accepts the mug and starts eating some of the bread. She cannot hide the smile that slowly brightens up her face. “Thank you, God,” she silently prays.

“At least, we have some food,” her mom tells her. “Yes, thank God. We have food,” she seconds. The heavy feeling lifts up a bit and she feels lighter than she did earlier. Surely, this situation won’t be forever. She knows that God will soon provide her with a solution. She only needs to believe that. Because, He always does.

Β©Diwa

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“A Horrendous Cycle Of Existence”


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The rich are eternally in want. They are perpetually hungry. This is because they know how it feels, to have a full stomach, that they always need to have it filled up, to bursting. Yet, fullness is a humdrum reality, for them. Thus, they get bored, easily, with what they have. They always have that constant craving for something new–for something different.

The poor are in nonstop need. They are forever starving. Yet, there is a blatant variance. The destitute have never really experienced satiation. Hence, they merely look for food, in order, to survive. Sometimes, they get lucky. Most times, they remain nothing–until, death snatches them away.

–Diwa

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